How long does it take to learn the Alexander Technique?

by Jennifer Mackerras

This was one of the questions that I was asked at the beginning of my group class at Bristol Folk House last night. I love my Folk House students for many reasons. One of them is that they aren't afraid to ask the questions that I know every student is thinking, but few are game enough to put into words.

It's a great question, but it needed some clarification. "What do you mean?" I asked.

My student replied that he felt he was having some success in applying what he was learning in class to his everyday life, but he wanted to know how long it would take to be able to do the Alexander Technique really well, and do it all by himself.

Now, my student is expecting a certain type of answer to this question, probably either a time-related answer (x number of months) or an answer about application (depends on how much you practice). Instead, I asked a question in return, and asked the class to answer it. How about you have a go, too!

How long does it take to learn the violin?

I'll give you a moment to think of your answer.

Got one? Great! We'll continue. :-)

My Folk House students gave answers like these:

· It depends on how good you want to be

· That's relative, depending on how much you practice

· Learning is a constantly evolving process, so you're always learning

And all of these answers are, on one level, true. How quickly you progress in anything does depend on the quality and frequency of your practice. And learning is indeed a constantly evolving process. But if we settle for these answers, when will be finished learning how to play the violin?


My Folk House students didn't look happy with this answer, and neither am I. Never is an unhappy word.

So what if we turned this on its head? Try this for size. As soon as we know that if we pluck or draw a bow across the string of the violin, and that we can change the note by changing the length of the string, we can play the violin. Everything else is refinement.

Can you see that this way of looking at the issue is instantly empowering? A couple of basic facts, and we have the basic tools to go away and work the rest out entirely by ourselves, if we choose to. How fantastic!

The Alexander Technique is no different. In fact, FM Alexander believed that we need to do this stuff for ourselves. Many sources quote him as saying "You can do what I do, if you do what I did." And what FM did was to work it all out for himself.

As soon as we know that a change in the relationship between our head and our body can make a difference to our freedom and ease of motion; once we understand the power and effectiveness that lies in stopping the unnecessary stuff that is getting in our way; then we have enough basic knowledge to go away and do the Alexander Technique for ourselves.

Everything else is refinement.


Jennifer Mackerras is an Alexander Technique teacher working in Bristol UK. Her past career in professional theatre has led her to be fascinated by problems experienced by actors, especially vocal problems and stage fright. She teaches on the Young Actors program at Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama, Cardiff UK. Website:

For more information about the Alexander Technique: The Complete Guide to the Alexander Technique